Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Peking Crispy Duck - The Story of Lucky Duck

This was my duck for today, her name was Lucky Duck, She weighed 1.8 kg and she came all the way from Netherlands. Really, her name was Lucky Duck, I am not bluffing you. She was really cheap, I got her for 7,50 euro, from the freezer section of a chinese supermart in Wijnegem.

This was how she looked like before I put on any makeup for her.  White and chubby.

 
This was how she looked like after a mini makeover and a little "tattoo".  Just with a little bit of 5-spice powder and salt, I managed to turn her into an oriental beauty. See the diamond/lattice tattoo I did for her?


She wanted to lose some weight, so I put her in the oven.


And after 1 hour, she successfully lost some fats and became like this. 


After another hour (2 hours later), in addition to losing weight, she also became tanner, I almost couldn't recognise her.





After yet another hour (3 hours later), her transformation was complete, she turned into a peking duck lookalike, although she was still very much a belgian dutch duck at heart.



So this was the life story of Luck Duck, she ended her short life in the stomachs of a young family in Belgium.

Ok, let me show you how to make Peking Crispy Duck (北京脆皮烤鸭) at home.
Here is my own simple improvised recipe :

Ingredients
1 duck, fresh or frozen
2 tbsp chinese 5-spice powder
2 tsp fine salt
an inch of ginger, thinly sliced
1 cucumber, julienned
few stalks of spring onions, julienned

Dipping Sauce
Lee Kum Kee Peking Duck Sauce (highly recommended, gives the best taste)
or Lee Kum Kee Plum Sauce
or Lee Kum Kee Hoisin Sauce

Method
1. If you are using frozen duck, remove from freezer the day before and leave it at room temperature to let it thaw overnight. Pat the duck dry with kitchen towel and rub it thoroughly with 2 tbsp of 5-spice powder and 2 tsp of salt, this is for a duck of about 1.8kg. Stuff a few small slices of ginger into the cavity and seal the cavity with toothpicks. Let it rest for at least an hour.


2. Preheat the oven to 170 degrees celsius. Prepare a roasting pan and a rack (I am using a round baking rack). Use a sharp knife and score the duck skin with a diamond/lattice pattern, this will allow the duck fat to drip out during roasting.  If you don't know how to prepare the duck skin, check out this link

3. Fill the roasting pan with a little water, this is to prevent the dripping duck fat from splattering onto the roasting pan and making a mess in the oven. Put the duck on the rack (with breast side up), and the rack on the roasting pan. Make sure the duck doesn't touch the base of the pan or the water. You don't want the duck to sit in a pool of duck fat. Place the roasting pan at the lower 1/3 of the oven so that the top of the duck is right in the middle. If you place the roasting pan in the middle of the oven, the top of the duck will be too near to the heating elements on top, and the duck will be burnt easily. Let it slow-roast at 170 degrees celsius for 1 hour.


4. After 1 hour, remove from oven, poke the duck skin all over with a toothpick to release more duck fat, turn the duck so that it is now breast side down and put it back to slow-roast again at 170 degrees celsius. If you have already poked the skin at the beginning before roasting, you will realise that it is better to poke the skin to release the duck fat after 1 hour of roasting, when the skin is more supple.


5. After 2 hours, again remove from oven,  poke the duck skin, turn the duck over to breast-side up and put it back for another hour.

6. After 3 hours, the duck should be ready. Most of the duck fat would have dripped out into the roasting pan and the duck skin should be hard and crispy. Remove the duck from the oven and allow it to rest for a while until it is no longer piping hot. Cut the duck into small pieces, prepare some ready-made chinese pancakes or springroll/popiah skin, fill each pancake with some duck meat with skin, some julienned cucumber and spring onions and 1 tsp of LKK peking duck sauce.

(Note: I am using the bigger version of popiah/springroll skin from a famous Singapore brand called Tee Yih Jia (第一家). I find it too big and a bit too chewy especially if you wrap it too many layers. Traditional peking duck is not tightly wrapped and rolled this way like a springroll or popiah, instead it is always loosely wrapped in a round pancake. Next time, I should attempt to make my own chinese pancakes if I have the time. :)



Voila, your homemade crispy peking duck pancakes are ready to be served. Smakelijk eten! :)

This is just my simple fuss-free way of preparing the Peking Crispy Roast Duck (北京脆皮烤鸭), if you find it not challenging enough or you want to spend more time and effort, do check out these few links below to get more inspiration:

- Best way to roast a duck
- Crispy Duck ala Nigella
- Sunflower Food Galore's Crispy Duck (Steam and Fry method)
- Ken Hom's Peking Duck videos part 1, part 2, part 3
- Homemade pancakes and homemade plum sauce

11 comments:

  1. lol - I got worried when you started naming your duck! I thought your chickens had a new friend!
    I see Lucky Duck is into piercings as well as tattoo!
    Heheheh - there is a different brand used over here in UK restaurants for chinese duck pancakes - the brand you used, my mum uses that for fried pancake/spring rolls.
    Your duck looks delicious!
    Happy Easter!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was ROFL when I saw your comment:
      "I see Lucky Duck is into piercings as well as tattoo!" - she got a navel piercing, hehe :)

      Oh, the Tee Yih Jia brand that I used, that is indeed only for spring rolls or popiahs, I used that bcos I dun have pancake skins in my fridge, and there was half a pack left from the last time I made popiah.

      Delete
  2. You could wrap the duck in flour tortillas instead?
    I've had duck wrapped in iceberg lettuce leaves too which were very nice - lighter than pancakes :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tortilla, that is indeed a good idea. Lettuce leaves should be great too! I was thinking next time I should use the frozen roti prata pastry I bought recently.

      Happy Easter to you and your family! :)

      Delete
  3. This duck looks so good! Perfectly roasted and yummy!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Miss B... I was reading on abt the story of Lucky Duck, and was wondering was it your duck that u reared..LOL...okok, now I knw. But at least Lucky Duck had made everyone happy:-D And of course, the delish dish you had prepared. Happy Easter:)

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hi Miss B, love your humour, you sure made me smile about your lucky duck story.
    Your Peking duck look awesome. I love Peking duck but never attempt to make at home. Maybe I will try one of this day. Thanks for sharing your recipe.

    Have a great week ahead.

    ReplyDelete
  6. My hubby once had a live duck as a present from a friend, but it never went as far as the front door, the duck ran or rather flew away when my hubby was trying to grab hold of it from the trunk of the car. So that kind of sums up our experience with having a duck as a pet! :)

    ReplyDelete
  7. Bee,
    Love your Lucky Duck story.
    Even love the transform lucky duck more.
    I guess you could try crepes as a wrap too :p
    mui

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Crepes, that is a good idea! I am thinking of using ready-made frozen Roti Paratha (Kawan brand or Tee Yih Jia brand) the next time. :)

      Delete
  8. Lol! Nice story, Miss B. Are you sure it's not Lucky Luke or Lucky Lucy? Ha ha ha!

    Wah, at Eur 7.50 for that size of duck, very cheap lah! I have never bought an entire duck, but have always wanted to make Lo Ark. Great idea of thawing the duck overnight.

    Love your crispy duck pancake, BUT it took such a long time in the oven :-(

    BTW, Miss B, just to let you know that we will not be around Antwerp area this weekend or the next, so the pineapple paste has to wait...

    ReplyDelete

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